DOWN SYNDROME KERRY

'Your generosity and support at this year's Ring of Kerry Charity Cycle will help us to increase our focus on training and employment opportunities and to expand our services across the growing adult population.'

We are a voluntary organisation run by parents and families in Kerry who have a family member with Down syndrome. Our goal is to help people with Down syndrome to reach their full potential and make their futures as bright and independent as possible by providing education, support and friendship every step of the way.

With over 200 member families throughout the county, we strive to provide services like Speech & language therapy, Occupational therapy, supported training & employment and Adult literacy courses every year. We also provide training & advice to professionals who deliver these services to our members. Down Syndrome Kerry relies completely on fundraising and the generosity of the public.

Help our teams continue to make a life-changing difference by raising funds this year for Down Syndrome Kerry.

Inspirational Stories

“My son Ethan was born with Down Syndrome. It was a post pregnancy diagnosis which left myself and my husband numb and in complete shock. We knew absolutely nothing about Down Syndrome.

However, from the moment of Ethan’s birth we were met with support from Down Syndrome Kerry. They have a new parent contact in place in University Hospital Kerry, which proved invaluable to us in relieving our fears of isolation.

Down Syndrome Kerry is a community we look to for support and friendship. Through the excellent services they offer and provide, it allows my son and others to integrate into the wider community and become valuable citizens who contribute to Ireland’s success as a country.”

Without the support and fundraising done by cyclists as part of the Ring of Kerry Charity Cycle, Down Syndrome Kerry would not be able to provide the much needed services and support that Christabel mentions.

For more information...

Visit: www.downsyndromekerry.ie

Down Syndrome Kerry